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REDUCE HEAT STRESS IN COWS BY MISTING OR SPRAYING

The THI (Temperature Humidity Index) will increase quickly if ventilation is not optimal.

The intended goal, "cooling and better cow welfare" will not be realized if the ventilation is not in order!

Therefore, make sure that the ventilation capacity in the cowshed is sufficient so that water vapor cannot settle.

As soon as the air is saturated with water vapor, droplets form. These water droplets have almost no cooling effect. The precipitation of the fine droplets creates a “blanket of water” on the cows.  As a result, they can no longer dissipate body heat.

 

YOU SEE THE SAME EFFECT ON A BEAUTIFUL AND (TOO) HOT AUTUMN DAY, ON UNSHAVED CATTLE IN A BARN

If you brush these animals over their backs in the fall, your hands are soaking wet, while the animals on the skin are very warm.

They cannot get rid of the heat.

In the fall THE ingredient for lung problems ...

SPRAYING COWS:

My advice:

Work with a total cycle time of 12 minutes (sprinklers on for 3 minutes, then sprinklers off for 9 minutes).

 

Higher flow rates ensure better cooling at animal level when spraying.

Coarser droplets penetrate the animal's hair better and therefore also cool the skin.

 

When watering 1.4 liters of water per minute per cow, (for 3 minutes) the water starts to drip down the side of the animal.

This creates a convection.

Water dripping from the cows cools in addition to evaporation by extracting heat from the body.

Larger amounts of water per minute and per animal do not increase the cooling effect.

 

Now that heat stress in cattle farming is becoming increasingly topical, more research is required in my opinion.

This is to assess whether the most efficient amount of water required for cooling cows in Central European conditions does not differ from that in Southern European conditions, (hot, dry climate in the south versus hot, humid climate in central Europe).

Finally, there are also large differences in housing, nutrition, milk production, etc.

 

Finally, we can say that in case of heat stress in the barn it is always better to cool than to do nothing at all.

Misting or spraying, both systems have their advantages and disadvantages.

 

I expect an increase and optimization of “barn cooling systems” in the coming years.

I am convinced that water cooling at animal level will be an integral part of cattle farming in the near future.